Archive for April, 2018


AMDG

In the current spate of stabbings in London, poisonings around the world and threats of war,  the post-resurrection stories of peace have a particular resonance.  It seems that Jesus’ favourite word after his resurrection is “peace.”    It is almost always the first word on his lips when he appears to his apostles: “Peace be with you.”  In the Gospels, this greeting appears after the trauma of his death and amidst the joy of his resurrection.  He is not recorded as giving this peace before his resurrection,  In fact, famously in Matthews Gospel, he said I did not bring peace to the world but a sword. However the risen Christ does offer this peace and it is an antidote to our modern, secular society where is so much stress, depression, and anxiety.

Christ’s peace is different to the peace that the world can give. The Resurrection unleashed a power that reached down to the dead, even to hell. Similarly, the power of his peace reaches all aspects of our life.

So imagine you are one of the disciples, encountering the risen Lord.  He invites you to look upon his glorious but wounded body and even to touch those wounds. As we gaze on those wounds we can see how far Christ’s gift of resurrection peace goes…

  • First, peace for our minds.  When we look at the wounds on his head left by the crown of thorns, we know for certain that his forgiveness is everlasting; our consciences can be at rest.
  • Secondly peace for our hearts. When we see the large wound in his side caused by the spear of the soldier,  we see that this opens up to us a way to his heart.  Thus we have the powerful devotion to the Sacred Heart and more recently the Divine Mercy.  We know for certain that we are loved with an undying, unconditional love.
  • Third, peace for our soul. When we look at the wounds caused by the nails in his hands and is feet, it reminds us that now, in the words of Teresa of Avila, we are his hands and feet.  He is asking us to continue the work that matters. This is a worthwhile mission, that will satisfy our thirst for meaning.

Only the risen Christ can give a peace that reaches into all areas of our complex and complicated lives. Let’s pray that it is something our political leaders start to experience.

 

AMDG

‘Saints next door’ is what the Pope Francis reminds us of in his new apostolic exhortation, Gaudete et Exsultate. This encouraging document is a call to holiness in today’s world and it may prove more attractive to many young people than the empty promises of celebrity and the tyranny of physical perfection.  The Pope is reminding us that ‘Holiness’ is not just found in esoteric devotional practices or historical hagiographical accounts.  Holiness is ‘a practical way for our own time.’

It is tempting to restrict our understanding of holiness to something that is for ‘professional religious’ i.e. for monks and nuns, and therefore out of the reach of ordinary people. However, in Vatican 2, Lumen Gentium spoke with great clarity about ‘The universal call to holiness’.  Pope John Paul II spoke powerfully about holiness being a task, not a state.   Here Pope Francis is building on this,  showing how this path to holiness involves a daily encounter between our weakness and the transformative power of God’s grace.

There is nothing new or radical about this, it has been a theme in the Church at many different times of renewal in its long and fascinating history – recently Francis de Sales gave some very practical steps for this.  For Pope Francis, as well as encouraging every-day holiness,  it is also about spotting the temptation to ‘false forms of holiness’.  Some of his familiar themes come up, for instance, the simple but heroic act of resisting gossip is a step on this path to holiness. Listening with patience and love, in a time when the experience of attentive listening and being listened too is becoming all too rare, is another way.  There is also some very good advice about where many of us spend a lot of our lives – online.

“  115 Christians too can be caught up in networks of verbal violence through the
internet and the various forums of digital communication. Even in Catholic media,
limits can be overstepped, defamation and slander can become commonplace, and
all ethical standards and respect for the good name of others can be abandoned.
The result is a dangerous dichotomy, since things can be said there that would be
unacceptable in public discourse, and people look to compensate for their own
discontent by lashing out at others. It is striking that at times, in claiming to
uphold the other commandments, they completely ignore the eighth, which forbids
bearing false witness or lying, and ruthlessly vilify others. Here we see how the
unguarded tongue, set on fire by hell, sets all things ablaze (cf. Jas 3:6).”