Category: Pope Francis


AMDG    Feast of  St Ignatius

“ So it is when a man stores up treasure for himself in place of making himself rich in the sight of God! ” Luke 12:21

This is the challWhosAtYourCenter-1rfhglh0klcn41e93wwg46ro4wpl9mezyp0u8kp9qsisenge at the heart of our faith – Who is at the center of your life?  Is it Me or God ?  If I am an honest is God an insurance policy that I have just in case my other plans don’t work out?  Is my career the most important thing and I am happy to come to church as long as God doesn’t get in the way – or ask me to do anything that will disturb my plans?   As long as I keep God in a box that is labelled ‘Sunday’ or ‘Church’ he won’t bother for the rest of the week…..

So many of us who call ourselves Christians – live like this…. Spending some much time and energy storing up treasure for ourselves – that we don’t really want God to trouble us…..  where do you put your trust?  Do you place your trust totally in God ?

51vxcbXaBmL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_According to the American Franciscan, Richard Rohr, it is the job of the first half of life – to establish ourselves, to leave home, to build an identity, to get a qualification (might be a university degree) and to start a career.  We all need to pass through this stage and therefore we develop a spirituality for the first half of our life – which is more concerned with outer things than inner things,  so my Catholicism is   and it is often only when a crisis comes along that we are jolted off our path.   Often it is when someone we love dies, maybe we go through an illness, and suddenly we start asking ourself – what is life all about?  All the stuff that was important about establishing our identity now becomes less important  and we start ‘Falling Upwards’ as Richard Rohr calls it – we start to put God in the center.

This happened to a young Spanish Nobleman, Inigo Lopez de Loyola – who found himself as a soldier defending the town of Pamplona – in 1521 – when a French Canonball ripped through his legs and shattered his knee.  Forced to recover in bed he started to ask himself these deeper questions – and realised it wasn’t just his knee that was shattered but also his self-image, his understanding of himself.  Bed ridden for 9 months he dreams about the future – about returning to his chivalrous ways ….  But as time dragged on and boredom forced him to read the only books that were at hand – religious books about the saints …. He noticed that he started to have a second type of daydream – instead of returning to be a solider for the King – he would become a pilgrim – a soldier for God.Thus 495 years ago began an journey that leads us to here to this beautiful church today –the Holy Name was founded in 1871 by men who have followed in the footsteps of Inigo.

Ignatius at Pamplona Back recovering in his bed in Loyola, Inigo the swashbuckling soldier (now crippled) notices that he starts to have a second type of dream which is obviously fed by his reading  – doing great things for God – outdoing the saints in holiness.  He noticed this left him feeling a deep joy and peace that lasted longer the other dreams of future worldly glories ahead….  He had discovered already the fruits of making yourself ‘rich in the sight of God’ … Inigo was becoming Ignatius.  He realised that up till then he had wasted too much time chasing  ‘vainglories’  – it all seemed worthless now when compared to things of God.

The genius of St Ignatius – a great gift for me in my life which I will always be grateful for – is that he allowed God to teach him – and then showed others how to search for God’s will in their lives.  He taught us to recognised Spiritual Consolation – the joy and the peace and the love that comes from moving closer to God….  We call this Ignatian Spirituality ….  And it is an incredible legacy that has led to countless men and women changing their lives – abandoning our obsession with material wealth and storing treasures that make us rich in the eyes of God.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAIpAAAAJGI0YzQzZDMyLTc5MzQtNGY1Ni1hMTc0LTRjMmZkMjVjNWI4MQAfter the fall of the Berlin Wall – the end of Communism – we all hoped for an new age of peace, of stability but in fact what happened was the world became more complicated …..  this new multi-polar world has been marked by Four things – that military planners called VUCA.   Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity.  The world seems to have become less predictable, more scary – Volatile in the nature and speed of change,  Uncertain in the lack of predictability, the prospects for surprise.  Complex in the different forces and issues, and Ambiguous in that reality is difficult to read now, Confusion seems to abound.

This is a confusing and at times scary world….  Where an 80 year old priest is brutally executed during mass, with unprecedented people on the move, with an acceleration of technological change that has never been seen before.

St Ignatius gives us a fantastic map to navigate our way through this world.  As God so patiently taught him – he wishes us to learn in a similar way – to be taught by God – who longs to be our teacher. It is a map – that helps us to navigate through a hurting and crazy world….  His way of praying helps us to listen to our teacher – even though there is so much to distract us away from these heavenly treasures.

And one his sons, Pope Francis, the first Jesuit Pope – is currently in Poland – celebrating mass as we speak with 3 million young people – Francis will be delighted to share such a special day for him ( and all Jesuits) with such a wonderful crowd – including our group of 20 from here.  The Pope’s  desire will be to share with all those youngsters the Joy of putting God in the center of your life – the Joy of being truly free – knowing that you are loved sinner – the peace that comes from falling Upward and knowing that in the end everything will be all alright.

Homily given at the Holy Name Church, Manchester  –   July 31st 2016 

AMDG

P1050059This a month of exciting new beginnings and sad farewells in Manchester.  When I started this job the provincial used a great image of the university chaplain being like the person who stands at the feeding station at the marathon.  You are there to give whatever help you can and then they are gone …. flying past, into the adventure of life.  We have already met some wonderful new students in welcome week – and I am filled with optimism for the year ahead.  We have great potential to build a special community.  However that optimism is tinged with sadness as we say farewell to some special friends.  One in particular has gone back to Damascus to be a lecturer.  As there are no flights into Syria – her father met her in Beirut and they drove across the border together.  We have all been praying for her on this dangerous journey – but she arrived back safe, and has sent us an email that I have permission to share ( an edited version)

 

Dear Fathers, I hope you are all well and in good health. I arrived to Damascus on Thursday; it was a long but safe journey. Today I went with my dad to university because I do not feel confident enough to be on my own in a city that I no longer know. Damascus has changed so much. Most women wear veils and this makes me feel very sick and very angry. Public transport is quite expensive because of the situation. It is relatively safe in my town where I live with my family. In the city centre and near university it is quite safe at the moment.  I still feel very scared every time I hear the M16, drones and all sort of weapons. It seems talking about weapons has become very familiar here among people. Relatives come to see me and all they talk about is weapons or war. I went to a small catholic church near my house this evening; it was lovely to be there and to be able to say the liturgy in Arabic. I do miss Holy Name.  I have to start preparing and designing my lectures.  Please do stay in touch!  May God bless you all and deliver you from every evil.  United in Jesus,  ******* .

So we keep her in our prayers at daily mass and her family – I have told her that she will be one of the keys in rebuilding Syria and bringing peace back.  Turning back to Manchester  I spied a great bit of advice for new Catholic students on the Jesuit homepage, created by Henry Longbottom who was with us for a few months.  It is an excellent reflection…. pass it on.

AMDG

Pope-Francis-South-KoreaAs Pope Francis beatifies 124 martyrs from Korea today, with huge crowds turning out in Seoul to meet the Pope, it may be opportune to look at unique origins of the church in Korea.  Catholicism has grown rapidly in South Korea from 1% of the population ten years ago to over 10% now.  South Korea is a fascinating country that has seen rapid development and economic growth.  It is  the only country in the history of the world that has gone from being a foreign aid recipient to being a major foreign aid donor in only one generation.  It also has huge ‘soft power’ now, not only as the home of Samsung. and being a technology leader in many fields – but also in the popularity of their films, soap operas and music – Remember Gangnam Style? K-Pop has overtaken Japan’s J Pop as the music on the iphones in the Pacific Rim and further afield.  I remember when I was in the Philippines I would often ask the young people which country they  would most like to visit, and the answer universally wasn’t US, or the UK but South Korea.

The origins of the Catholic Church in Korea are fascinating.  Christianity has struggled to make inroads into Asia – and the exceptions – Philippines, East Timor which received Spanish and Portuguese missionaries,  the Korean Catholic Church grew for the first hundred years without any priests or visits from missionaries. Christianity was brought to Korea by a Korean diplomat who had encountered the books of Matteo Ricci in the court in Beijing.  Ricci is an incredible character, an Italian Jesuit, who missionary work was so successful that he gained access to the Forbidden City – the first westerner to do so.  His appreciation of Chinese culture and the peoples admiration of him as a learned scholar gave Ricci great inroads.  He was the first to translate Kong Fuzi’s teachings into Latin – thus coining the name Confucius – Ricci became a bridge between the east and the west.

ricciThe book that probably marks his greatest legacy was ‘The true meaning of the Lord of Heaven’ which argues that Confucianism and Christianity are not opposed and in fact are remarkably similar in key ways.  It was a way of explaining Christian doctrine into Confucian thought and proved to be very successful.  Ricci used this treatise in his missionary effort to convert Chinese intellectuals, men who were educated in Confucianism and the Chinese classics.   It was this book that brought Christianity to Korea in 1603, where it was to grow, without access to the sacraments, without any active priestly ministry.

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