Tag Archive: Evangelli Gaudium


AMDG

Milton Erikson,  a  psychiatrist, would ask patients who were experiencing depression to count chimneys.  It proved to be surprisingly successful.  First of all, it got people out of their houses (rather than sitting inside and letting negative thoughts rotate around their heads.  Secondly, when they were outside counting chimneys they lifted their heads up ensuring the maximum amount of daylight was entering their eyes.  This simple act would lift their spirits in a very effective way.  By forcing his patients to get out of their head and be more present to the environment a desolating spell had been broken.  This is exactly what happens every time we deliberately get out of our heads and engage with the present,  in the popular pseudo-Buddhist language it is a form of mindfulness. In the language of Pope Francis and Evangelium Gaudium, ‘Realities are more important than ideas’ 231-233.

Returning to the world of ideas, maybe the next step then would then be developing a mindfulness of gratitude – or ‘gratefulness’.  Start the day in gratefulness of a hot shower. For me, it is something that I am especially aware of when I come back from travelling, particularly in the developing world.  I find myself standing in a powerful hot shower in the morning, thinking about all that has gone into this working. It helps me start the day in a good mood, grateful for all that has gone right to put that in place, trying not to feel ‘entitled’ to have a hot shower when so many of the billions on the planet don’t have a luxury like this to start the day.  I think of friends I have lived with in India, Peru, the Philippines, East Africa all whose morning ablutions are very different.

When I am actually standing in the shower I think of where the water is from the Thames or the River Lee? What journey has it been on, from Teddington Weir or closer? How does it get to Tottenham in the first place?  All the infrastructure that comes into play to get clean water in my shower, all the thing that have to go right for it to be a reliable supply.  Then I think about the thermostat hidden away somewhere that constantly adjusts the temperature so that I’m not boiled like a lobster or frozen like a penguin, especially when someone else is using water in the building.  Having experienced a fair amount of showers that are alternately too hot or too cold, this feels like a blessing.  Then the electric pump that makes sure that high-pressure water comes out which is so refreshing.

It’s a simple exercise but a great way to start the day.

Joy – (EG 1)

AMDG

Now that academic term has finished – and many students have left Manchester, I have a little bit of space and have decided to slowly read through Evangelii Gaudium  (The Joy of the Gospel) – Pope Francis’s rather lengthy exhortation.  It has been reported as the Pope’s dream for the church – and as you would expect there is some dynamite there.

Evangelii_Gaudium-255x390In the Introduction the Pope reminds us how Joy is at the centre of the Gospel message, giving many examples of this.  I think Joy is a rare experience for many people, but when they meet someone is authentically joyful it makes a powerful impression.   I have always argued that there is a profound difference between joy and happiness – happiness is something that so many strive for, and can achieve when they have a good job, a nice house, financial security and meaning.  So happiness is like a transaction – and it is great when people achieve it.  However Joy is like an unexpected gift – there is nothing that we can do to earn it – only having a heart that is open to God – our creator.     We were created for joy.  Francis reminds us that the sharing of what is really important to us  brings joy.  It also strikes me that when we live joyful lives – people are fascinated, attracted, and – that is when we have to be ready to account for our joy.  This is a different type of evangelisation than bible bashing or door stepping, people coming to us and asking us – why are you so joyful?  I remember a young man from Spain coming last year and asking for the sacrament of confirmation. When I asked him why now? ( he was in his late twenties ) he replied that he had seen some of the students faces who came to mass and the chaplaincy and ‘their eyes were shining’.  (I immediately checked that we had no drug dealers on site…. 🙂 ) 

National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil

National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil

However Francis is also gently chastising a distorted type of religion and religiosity. We are warned about this with the great line   ‘There are Christians whose lives seem like Lent rather than Easter’  (6)   .  Reminding us that the Gospel offers us the chance to live life on a higher plane he then investigates what might prevent this joy. Francis’s previous job as Cardinal Archbishop of Buenos Aires led to him being a key figure in the last general assembly of the Conference of Latin American Bishops (CELAM). Bergoglio, who was a cardinal at the time was the key figures who helped prepare the final document, the ‘Aparecida’ document.   One of the most interesting quotes is lifted directly from that – :

  “Life grows by being given away, and it weakens in isolation and comfort. Indeed, those who enjoy life most are those who leave security on the shore and become excited by the mission of communicating life to others”  EG 10 ,  Aparecida 360

So the more security, the more comfort and the more isolated we become the more sterile our faith is.   We become like spiritual ‘gated communities’  (my words not the Pope’s).   There is an ecclesiology here that is challenging for many of us who have a default position of seeing the world as hostile.  To a Jesuit ear however you can hear so much of  the Spiritual Exercises of St Ignatius.  Particularly his meditation on The Two Standards (click here if you would like to find out more).  So the opening theme of his exhortation is Joy – and people are thirsting to encounter authentic joy.  One of the most popular posts in this blogs archives is an article about the joy of the fourth week of the exercises, with currently (Dec 2013) over 7,000 individual hits, called a Joy that Surpasses all Joys.  We all need more joy in our lives!