Tag Archive: Faith


Equilibrium & Stephen Fry

AMDG

This is an edited Version of the Homily Given at the Holy Name, Manchester on Feb 9th 2015

saving-face-behind-the-scene-1We all know the Genre of documentary where we get to follow 24hrs in the life of a celebrity … A day in the life of Paris Hilton – or Steven Gerard….. Well today’s gospel (Mark 1 29-37) gives us, without the cameras and the irritating commentary, A day in the life of Jesus Christ ….. It is at the beginning of Marks Gospel and is unusually full – the Healing of Peters Mother-in- Law, and then the healing of the crowds after sunset- and then the key –  Jesus’s pre-dawn prayer in a lonely place – and then his journey preaching and casting out devils.

If you were the producer of this programme – in the midst of all the demands being placed on Jesus – you would make that Prayer before the dawn the hinge moment of the documentary – that is the key scene. Sure all the miracles and his teaching would be very telegenic, but that period of prayer in a lonely place, on his own, before dawn is the key to understanding Jesus. It is here we see his union with the Father – it here we understand where he gets his power from, his energy and compassion…. And perhaps most interestingly it is here where we see how he keeps his equilibrium amongst so many demands and so many expectations.

JobWe all lead busy lives, and we know how easy it is to lose our balance and sense of perspective – Listen to Job in the first reading ‘Months of Delusion I have assigned for me – Nothing for my own but nights of grief’ It is easy for us to get sucked into the business of our lives and start thinking like this – St Ignatius refers to it as Spiritual Desolation. Someone who seems to have lost that sense of balance, that equilibrium this week is the famous atheist Stephen Fry. On Irish TV he was asked what he would say to God if he went to heaven. Fry responded, “I would say, ‘How dare you. How dare you create a world in which there is such misery that’s not our fault? It’s not right. It’s utterly, utterly evil. The God who created this universe, if he created this universe, is quite clearly a maniac, an utter maniac, totally selfish.”

While Stephen Fry’s complaint reveals more about Stephen Fry than Almighty God (as this comment piece suggests it may be difficult to distinguish sometimes) , it is still a very a common complaint made, maybe in a less strident tone, and a question worth asking. If your friends know about your faith – It might well come up again and again in conversations in the pub, in the lecture theatre, in the lab, in the gym ….. You are a Christian Why does God Allow Evil? Isn’t Steven Fry right? In my response I might want to point talk of free will. We may do what we like. God, as a loving father, does not force us to do anything, but allows us to learn and grow. When we get it wrong unless we regret and try and change our life then evil proliferates. In ways we cannot comprehend the vast majority of the suffering and evil in the world comes from this basic reality. However as Christians we also have this great hope – the resurrection. God is no stranger to suffering as we see in the cross of Jesus but the darkness of the Cross and Good Friday becomes the new hope of Easter.  So matter how bleak it appears, despite the greatest evil, all that is beautiful, good and true will triumph.

So these challenges – made to us in pubs or in friends houses – actually become a wonderful opportunity to witness to our faith and give account of our hope… and why faith filled people often live joyful lives….. as someone once said it is better to light a candle that curse the darkness…..

whirlwindToday’s readings give us a lot to ponder about. In the book of Job we have the most powerful exploration of this problem of pain and suffering – I haven’t come across another text in literature from any culture that looks this problem in the eye and tries explores it so bravely and honestly – It is at the beginning of Chapter 38 that God answers Job from the whirlwind and gives him a tour of the cosmos…. Where you there Job when I created the heavens and the earth – He shows Job the Plan of Salvation that spans all of space and time.. So if you want to answer your sceptical friends questions immerse yourself in the book of Job .. and then remember that in the Gospel we see how Jesus keeps his equilibrium in the face of so much suffering and brings his healing power to all those people who come to him …….

But the best way to answer this critique of faith – actions rather than words – how you live your life – do we try and imitate Jesus – do we try and bring healing to peoples lives – do we put our faith into action? Here at the chaplaincy there are many ways to respond to suffering – the foodbank of course – our great SVP group who made three homeless runs this week and volunteer in many other ways – and at the end of mass tonight you will get a great chance to meet Clara who organises volunteering placements in some of the poorest parts of the world for Jesuit Missions… So its better to light a candle than curse the darkness and you can inspire you sceptical friends by putting your faith into action

Jesus will ask you at the end of time – What have you done for the sick, naked, hungry, for the poor…….

AMDG

P1050059This a month of exciting new beginnings and sad farewells in Manchester.  When I started this job the provincial used a great image of the university chaplain being like the person who stands at the feeding station at the marathon.  You are there to give whatever help you can and then they are gone …. flying past, into the adventure of life.  We have already met some wonderful new students in welcome week – and I am filled with optimism for the year ahead.  We have great potential to build a special community.  However that optimism is tinged with sadness as we say farewell to some special friends.  One in particular has gone back to Damascus to be a lecturer.  As there are no flights into Syria – her father met her in Beirut and they drove across the border together.  We have all been praying for her on this dangerous journey – but she arrived back safe, and has sent us an email that I have permission to share ( an edited version)

 

Dear Fathers, I hope you are all well and in good health. I arrived to Damascus on Thursday; it was a long but safe journey. Today I went with my dad to university because I do not feel confident enough to be on my own in a city that I no longer know. Damascus has changed so much. Most women wear veils and this makes me feel very sick and very angry. Public transport is quite expensive because of the situation. It is relatively safe in my town where I live with my family. In the city centre and near university it is quite safe at the moment.  I still feel very scared every time I hear the M16, drones and all sort of weapons. It seems talking about weapons has become very familiar here among people. Relatives come to see me and all they talk about is weapons or war. I went to a small catholic church near my house this evening; it was lovely to be there and to be able to say the liturgy in Arabic. I do miss Holy Name.  I have to start preparing and designing my lectures.  Please do stay in touch!  May God bless you all and deliver you from every evil.  United in Jesus,  ******* .

So we keep her in our prayers at daily mass and her family – I have told her that she will be one of the keys in rebuilding Syria and bringing peace back.  Turning back to Manchester  I spied a great bit of advice for new Catholic students on the Jesuit homepage, created by Henry Longbottom who was with us for a few months.  It is an excellent reflection…. pass it on.

AMDG

Tracy_Caldwell_Dyson_in_Cupola_ISSAt the beginning of the Second Week of the Exercises Ignatius presents us with the Contemplation on the Incarnation.  This has two main elements, he asks to us imagine the Trinity looking down on the world, seeing  and hearing all that is happening, births, deaths, wars, peace etc…   The decision to intervene by seconding the second person of the Trinity (the Son) is made.  Then in the contemplation, we zoom in, Google Earth style, to Mary’s house in Nazareth and the Angel visiting her.  Mary’s ‘Fiat’ – her Yes – is one word that history turns on.  We know how courageous this ‘yes’ is for young women in a culture that has brutal punishments for those unmarried women who bring shame no their families.

bbc-nativity-maryMary’s fiat – ‘ Let it be done unto me’  – is central in the Catholic understanding of the Incarnation – she gives her assent to cooperate with Divine Grace.  I remember being invited to watch a preview of the BBC produced ‘Nativity‘ in Soho in 2010 – it is an excellent production that was shown in four parts.  After the preview some of the producers bounded up to me – seeing that I had been visibly moved and wanted to know my reaction.  I said I thought it had been brilliant but that they had made one mistake. The wide grins started to fade and with furrowed brows they asked me what mistake –  I replied ‘ Well in this version Mary said no to the angel’ …. the brows became more furrowed and the smiles vanished,   moving on to the next person, they said indignantly ‘there’s no right or wrong’.

A wonderful poem on Mary’s fiat is by Bishop Robert F Morneau ….. and yes I know this doesn’t take into account the Immaculate Conception (before you write in) …. but even if theologically not quite correct it opens a new vista onto Mary’s fiat…

 

Annunciation

Were others asked?
A lassie from an isle in a distant sea?
A maiden in North Africa
or a slave girl from the Congo?
How many times were angels sent
and returned, unheard, unheeded?
Was Mary tenth on salvation’s list.
Or the hundredth?
And you, my soul.
was fiat spoken
when the angel came?

 

Blog at WordPress.com. | The Motion Theme.
[ Back to top ]
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,436 other followers