Tag Archive: Football


images (4)Today’s Saint – Saint Lawrence – is famous as a deacon in Rome.  As a deacons in the early church, Lawrence had the responsibility for the material goods of the Church & distributing alms to the poor.  In the third century when the Roman emperor ordered the death of the Pope, the prefect then ordered for the churches goods to be handed over. When St. Lawrence was asked for the treasures of the Church he brought forward the poor, among whom he had divided the treasure as alms.”Behold in these poor persons the treasures which I promised to show you; to which I will add pearls and precious stones, those widows and consecrated virgins, which are the church’s crown.”

images (1)When reading this I though of the commitment to the poor of Pope Francis – like Lawrence his faith was rooted in the daily struggle of the people he lived with.   It is a rooted faith – and then of course I thought of his football team San Lorenzo (Saint Lawrence).   It is great to hear that he is keeping his membership up (reminding me to renew my Liverpool membership card!).   Like many football teams San Lorenzo’s roots are actually ecclesial.   San Lorenzo was formed by a group of kids that used to play football in the corner of two busy  streets of Buenos Aires.  Due to the increasing traffic in the city, playing football at the streets became a risky activity for the boys. Fr Lorenzo Massa, the priest of the neighbourhood’s church, saw how a tram almost knocked down one of the boys while they were playing in the streets. As a way to prevent more accidents, he offered the boys to play in the church’s backyard, under the condition they had to go to mass on Sundays.  Wanting to call the club after him the priest denied to be honoured that way. Nevertheless, the name was finally accepted by the priest, explaining that the name would not honour himself but , St Lawrence of Rome

images (3)Pope Francis still pays his annual membership fee – and so proud of their fan becoming the Pope – San Lorenzo recently took to the pitch with his face replacing the advertising on their shirts.  A faith that is rooted and close to the passions of the people – that reminds us that God is close to us in all things.   A faith that shares the passions of many. The 34rd General Congregation of the Jesuits published a decree on our mission and culture – at one point it says  “(as Jesuits) …. We have sometimes sided with the “high culture” of the elite in a particular setting: disregarding the cultures of the poor and sometimes, by our passivity, allowing indigenous cultures or communities to be destroyed”  ….. On a final note I recommend a great book called ‘Thank God for Football’ by Wirral author Peter Lupson – he traces the roots of  Aston Villa, Barnsley, Birmingham City, Bolton Wanderers, Everton, Fulham, Liverpool, Manchester City, Queen’s Park Rangers, Southampton, Swindon Town and Tottenham Hotspur all back to churches and priests / ministers!

Faith in & of the Police

AMDG

Driving into Manchester 10 days ago to drop off my stuff turned out to be a very eventful journey.  My brother and I were riveted to the radio listening to the findings Independent Hillsborough report (click here).  Many friends were involved in the crush at that Liverpool match in 1989, but thankfully no close friends were among the 96 who died, although we knew some of the victims.  As has been known on Merseyside for a long while, but now thankfully by the rest of the world, the subsequent smearing of the fans could well be the biggest cover up in British history lead by South Yorkshire Police.  However as is often the case, out of tragedy and suffering some good has come, including a solidarity with other fans, the beautiful gestures by United at Anfield on Sunday and dignified leadership by Alex Ferguson. So with mixed and strong emotions, my twin brother (an Evertonian) and I arrived in Manchester.  The radio coverage was riveting but one thing that distracted our attention was driving past a huge video screen that was offering a £50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of a man called Dale Cregan.

Three days later this man, whose face seemed to be all over Manchester, shot dead two unarmed policewomen and then walked into a police station to give himself up.  Acts of wanton destruction and evil like this are always disorienting and confusing.  After a week of anger towards the police for the Hillsborough cover-up, these killings put policing back into perspective.  It is unprecedented for two police women to be killed, and the worst police deaths since the 60’s. But again amidst all the shock, healing started to happen from an unusual source. The Chief Constable of the Greater Manchester Police in an interview talked about how his faith was helping him.  This is what Sir Peter Fahy, a Catholic, said

“I think a lot of us feel passionately that policing is a vocation. It is a calling. I feel that in terms of my own faith but I know a lot of officers that don’t have a faith, but feel exactly the same – that it is a vocation, that it’s not just a job and I think that’s almost what you go back to in difficult times and difficult circumstances that how unfair something may feel, how inadequate you may feel you do actually rely on that you’re doing your best, and that this is your vocation. The chance for me personally to be able to, every day, to have bit of quiet time, pray, think about your own values, your own sense of vocation, and to examine your own conscience I think is really, really important…… For me personally and a lot of people of faith, prayer is important… you do often feel so helpless, so praying for the dead officers, praying for their families, becomes your own reaction, your own expression of hope really for them, at a time of great need.”

Very powerful words – particularly at a time when there strong pressures to silence the religious voice in the public sphere, or to portray faith as being the realm of bigots and fundamentalists.   It also made me think – would the interview have been picked up elsewhere in the country or is this a fruit of the BBC relocation to Salford?   There is much to reflect on what he said about the healing power of prayer, but maybe more importantly what he also said about examining your conscience.  If only more of the South Yorkshire Police had engaged in that activity more regularly.

Limit to what money can buy

AMDG

Hotel Klosterbrau – former monastery turned 5-star hotel

A great story yesterday about the richest football team in the world, Manchester City being thwarted by a priest!  The club, the newly crowned English Champions, are bank rolled by their owner Sheik Mansour the emir of Abu Dhabi.  They have spent around £250,000  on their pre-season high-altitude training camp in the Austrian village of Seefeld.  They are staying in a five-star hotel which is a former monastery. There has been three months’ preparation to make sure everything on the trip is perfect. The players, management and staff have taken over the top three floors of the hotel with their own private dining room, gym and massage area. They have even asked for specific high-density mattresses and summer duvets in all of their 54 double suites. The hotel had the mattresses hand-made and imported from an expert in Rome at a cost of around €1,000 per room!  They have also brought in its own chefs to prepare the food, with fresh fish flown in every two days from the Atlantic and North Sea.

The former monastery still has an active Catholic Church attached to it.  But here City found out that their spending power has limits!  The Hotel Manager said: “They wanted to ask the priest to switch off the bells of the church attached to the hotel. “The bells are ringing at 7 in the morning, 8 in the morning, and 9 in the morning.” Quite rightly the priest said No! ….. and he’s not even a United fan!!  So City can buy the Premier League Trophy but even they have found there are limits to what their money can buy.  As the Mastercard advert  might have said….

Pre Season Training Camp…..  £250,000

Hand Made Mattresses ………       £54,ooo

Fresh Fish flown in ……………       £ 28,ooo

Waking up to bells calling the faithful to mass as it has done for 500 years ….. Priceless !

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