Tag Archive: peace


AMDG

In the current spate of stabbings in London, poisonings around the world and threats of war,  the post-resurrection stories of peace have a particular resonance.  It seems that Jesus’ favourite word after his resurrection is “peace.”    It is almost always the first word on his lips when he appears to his apostles: “Peace be with you.”  In the Gospels, this greeting appears after the trauma of his death and amidst the joy of his resurrection.  He is not recorded as giving this peace before his resurrection,  In fact, famously in Matthews Gospel, he said I did not bring peace to the world but a sword. However the risen Christ does offer this peace and it is an antidote to our modern, secular society where is so much stress, depression, and anxiety.

Christ’s peace is different to the peace that the world can give. The Resurrection unleashed a power that reached down to the dead, even to hell. Similarly, the power of his peace reaches all aspects of our life.

So imagine you are one of the disciples, encountering the risen Lord.  He invites you to look upon his glorious but wounded body and even to touch those wounds. As we gaze on those wounds we can see how far Christ’s gift of resurrection peace goes…

  • First, peace for our minds.  When we look at the wounds on his head left by the crown of thorns, we know for certain that his forgiveness is everlasting; our consciences can be at rest.
  • Secondly peace for our hearts. When we see the large wound in his side caused by the spear of the soldier,  we see that this opens up to us a way to his heart.  Thus we have the powerful devotion to the Sacred Heart and more recently the Divine Mercy.  We know for certain that we are loved with an undying, unconditional love.
  • Third, peace for our soul. When we look at the wounds caused by the nails in his hands and is feet, it reminds us that now, in the words of Teresa of Avila, we are his hands and feet.  He is asking us to continue the work that matters. This is a worthwhile mission, that will satisfy our thirst for meaning.

Only the risen Christ can give a peace that reaches into all areas of our complex and complicated lives. Let’s pray that it is something our political leaders start to experience.

 

The UN in Africa

AMDG

Last week I spent a very interesting few hours visiting UNON, the United Nations Office in Nairobi.  I was checking it out akaribunis a place to bring students on a visit next year as part of their induction in East Africa. Globally the UN now has four permanent bases, New York where the general assembly of its constituent 193 member states takes place every (the Holy See has permanent
observer status). There are two more offices in Europe, in Geneva, Vienna and most recently one has opened up in Nairobi in 1996.  Many have argued that it was long overdue to give the UN a sure footing in the continent of Africa, where its original and overriding purpose is to promote peaceis often under threat.   Its environment  programme (UN and habitat programme (are headquartered in Naorobi, but many of its other programmes / funds / commisions also have offices there.

Many  feel the UN is in crisis  – some world argue, given its impossible remit, a state of permanent crisis, its faces the challenge to be semper reforandum – always reforming.   The core dream and vision of the UN is worth fighting for. Riddled with politics, often rendering it ineffective ( Russia & China’s unscrupulous use of the veto in the security council for example) … it is still the only supranational political body that can be called on in a crisis, and often the only one with the clout to get warring parties around the table.  The extraordinary meeting of the Security council in Narobi bringing together the Sudanese on November 2004 is a recent example.secretary-general_ban_ki-moon_right_meets_with_sudanese_foreign_minister_ibrahim_ghandour_oct_2_2015_-_un_evan_schneider-e7ab4

Currently the UN has a succession crisis as they look for a new secretary  general. The recent leadership of the South Koran, Ban Ki Moon has been disappointing, seen as being too protocol bound, lacking the dyanimism and diplomatic genius of his predecessor Kofi Annan.  So there is a sense of urgency to select a leader, in what appears to be the most transparent process yet.   The PC option is to have a women from Eastern Europe, with two Bulgarian canditates spoken of.  But one of the things that has discredited the UN so often is being sucked into the quagmire of ideology and development politics, part of the reform must be shedding the Political Correctness for a more meritocratic way of operating. The farcical appearance of the Vatican before the Comittee for the  Rights of the Child (CRC) was widely criticised for being an axe-grinding exercise, not sticking to its remit.  It seemed to have written the report before hearing an evidence, and like the end of the film Spotlight it conflated what had happened 20 years ago with the present, with no acknowledgement of the serious distance the church has gone in protecting children – for excellent analysis of this read here.

All of the good and bad of the UN are visible in its office at Nairobi, we need to engage creatively with it, accepting and building on the good and recognising and letting go of the bad, if we want to make the world a better place.

Longing & Advent

AMDG

Last week we hosted a very interesting talk from Dr John Healey the Professor of Semitic Studies at the University of Manchester.  John and his wife, Elizabeth,  are just back from a visit to Iraqi Kurdistan, where they visited a number of churches and monasteries and also went to see the Chaldaean Archbishop of Erbil, Bashar Warda (who is a Redemptorist).  We had a group of students from Syria and also a student from Iraq at the talk.  It was very powerful, but also very depressing.  Some of the most powerful interventions where from the students. One talked about her family in Damascus, who said to her recently ‘We don’t belong here any more’.  Their family have been there for generations.  Another talked about how he grew up in Baghdad with many Muslim friends and neighbours, but how a darkness had descended and they no longer mixed.

It was distressing to hear – on one level we can only pray, but on another we started the first inter-faith soup run for the homeless  in Manchester last  week.   Maybe moderate forms of Islam & Christianity in the West may eventually exert pressure back in those countries where the Christians are slowly being exterminated. One of my favourite Advent Hymns is ‘ O Come, O Come Emmanuel,  and ransom captive Israel, that mourns in lonely exile here, until the Son of God appear…..’   This longing for peace from all forms of captivity and diminshment is a very powerful part of our advent prayer…..  watch this below……  as a friend tweeted (@austeni)…   Stunning. Listen, and pray.