Tag Archive: Reform


AMDG

51vxcbXaBmL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_A book which has had a big influence on me recently was Richard Rohr’s Falling Upwards.  Rohr, an American Franciscan has written many books on Spirituality.   He is a ‘spiritual entrepreneur’ having started different communities and recently a Centre for Action & Contemplation.  One of the themes he is very interested in is that of Male Spirituality.  He is acutely aware of a modern male crisis, often linked to the search for a masculine identity. We know about the pressures and expectations that men and women face in their daily lives, its just that men arent very good at talking about it Recently looking at  as sharp rise in  Male Suicide rates,  analysed  and concluded that men are failing to cope, as well as keeping their problems hidden from others

Looking at the perennial issue of reform in the Church – it is important to note a sharp generational tension in the Catholic priesthood (at least what I perceive in the UK).  The older guys – often the ‘formators’ –  are confused about the younger guys who are entering.  Those of us born since the 70’s were formed in postmodern age, where almost nothing has been stable or constant or certain,  social attitudes have changed dramatically.  The church has been trying to reform itself through the Second Vatican Council, the reception of which takes generations to ‘bed in’.   Exacerbating this in the Catholic Church have been the recent  years of public scandal over paedophilia and cover-up by the hierarchy. Now, at least in the UK these scandals are being revealed everywhere, BBC, even Football Clubs, so at least the Catholic Church is not being portrayed as the unique place for these terrible crimes.

Rohrs’ thesis is that the task in the first half of life is in ‘forming the container’…. 51606445-wounded-child-falling-from-his-bike-and-crying-while-holding-his-knee-with-dad-coming-to-help-isolat-stock-photocreating our identity, building up our ego, leaving the nest, achieving things.  Kids test their strength, and when they fall down, they have to pick themselves up, dust themselves down and get on with it.  However most of us get to a point where we are secure enough in who we are that we realise that these things don’t matter so much any more – and we start falling upwards.  This is chronological, we have to past through the first phase to get to the second – but we move at different paces…. often linked to suffering.  So for instance, you could be in your 60’s but emotionally you are still a teenager, need your ego boost, need attention etc you are still in the first half of life.  You can also be 16, caring for an ill parent, looking after your brothers and sisters as though you were their dad or mum, and you can be incredibly mature… already you may have reached Rohrs’ falling upward stage.

It may be that we have a generation of priest, seminarians and some bishops,  a high percentage who have what we would call “father wounds,” which can take the form of an absent, emotionally unavailable, alcoholic, or even abusive father and often had no chance to do the task of the first half of life well. So now they want a tribe that is both superior and secure— the danger is a generation of seminarians and young clergy who are cognitively rigid and “risk adverse”; who want to circle the wagons around their imagined secure and superior group whilst the Pope is encouraging them to get out of the sacristy and not be frightened of making mistakes.  This results in a form of clericalism –   preoccupation with clothing, titles, perks, and externals of religion; and more complex things such as  ecumenism, interfaith dialogue, and social justice are dead issues for them. None of us can dialogue with others until we can calmly and confidently hold our own identity.

downloadAn interesting thesis – fitting into to why some aspects of the Catholic blogosphere and media are obsessed with Amoris Letitia… and looking inwards…. talk about the reform of the reform rather than getting their hands dirty by sharing in the messiness and brokenness of all our lives. In a time of VUCA – Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity, it is tempting to pull up the drawbridge.  Whereas we are called to deepen our faith, put out into the deep – and listen to Jesus saying ‘Do Not be Afraid for I am with you always’.

The UN in Africa

AMDG

Last week I spent a very interesting few hours visiting UNON, the United Nations Office in Nairobi.  I was checking it out akaribunis a place to bring students on a visit next year as part of their induction in East Africa. Globally the UN now has four permanent bases, New York where the general assembly of its constituent 193 member states takes place every (the Holy See has permanent
observer status). There are two more offices in Europe, in Geneva, Vienna and most recently one has opened up in Nairobi in 1996.  Many have argued that it was long overdue to give the UN a sure footing in the continent of Africa, where its original and overriding purpose is to promote peaceis often under threat.   Its environment  programme (UN and habitat programme (are headquartered in Naorobi, but many of its other programmes / funds / commisions also have offices there.

Many  feel the UN is in crisis  – some world argue, given its impossible remit, a state of permanent crisis, its faces the challenge to be semper reforandum – always reforming.   The core dream and vision of the UN is worth fighting for. Riddled with politics, often rendering it ineffective ( Russia & China’s unscrupulous use of the veto in the security council for example) … it is still the only supranational political body that can be called on in a crisis, and often the only one with the clout to get warring parties around the table.  The extraordinary meeting of the Security council in Narobi bringing together the Sudanese on November 2004 is a recent example.secretary-general_ban_ki-moon_right_meets_with_sudanese_foreign_minister_ibrahim_ghandour_oct_2_2015_-_un_evan_schneider-e7ab4

Currently the UN has a succession crisis as they look for a new secretary  general. The recent leadership of the South Koran, Ban Ki Moon has been disappointing, seen as being too protocol bound, lacking the dyanimism and diplomatic genius of his predecessor Kofi Annan.  So there is a sense of urgency to select a leader, in what appears to be the most transparent process yet.   The PC option is to have a women from Eastern Europe, with two Bulgarian canditates spoken of.  But one of the things that has discredited the UN so often is being sucked into the quagmire of ideology and development politics, part of the reform must be shedding the Political Correctness for a more meritocratic way of operating. The farcical appearance of the Vatican before the Comittee for the  Rights of the Child (CRC) was widely criticised for being an axe-grinding exercise, not sticking to its remit.  It seemed to have written the report before hearing an evidence, and like the end of the film Spotlight it conflated what had happened 20 years ago with the present, with no acknowledgement of the serious distance the church has gone in protecting children – for excellent analysis of this read here.

All of the good and bad of the UN are visible in its office at Nairobi, we need to engage creatively with it, accepting and building on the good and recognising and letting go of the bad, if we want to make the world a better place.